Some More of Our Readers’ Questions Answered

MARCH 7, 2011 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 8
Two weeks ago we answered some of our readers’ frequent questions, and we solicited more. We heard from several of you with good questions of general interest. Among those (with identifying information and some details stripped out):

My wife and I do not have any obvious family member to handle our estates. Whom should we name as executor? Most (but not all) married couples will leave administration of their estate in the hands of the surviving spouse after the death of one spouse. Most (but not all) will name one or more of their children to act in the case of simultaneous death, or upon the second death. But what are your choices if you do not want to name your children, or if you have no children?

Of course you can name other family members to handle your estate. Some clients even name parents, although of course it is uncommon for parents to live longer than their children. Siblings, grandchildren, cousins can all be good candidates. Cousin Emily, the lawyer in Illinois, might be a perfectly good candidate. Same for nephew Dale, the CPA in California.

Some clients — occasionally even those with children — may choose to have a professional named to handle their estate. In that case there are at least four types of choices to consider:

1. Bank trust offices. Not all trust companies are related to banks, so we do not mean to limit the choice to bank trust companies — but the image of a bank officer acting as trustee is at least a little bit familiar to most. The good news: it is likely that your bank trust department will still be around, even long after your death. Even if it changes names, or merges with another bank, it will still exist and be identifiable. We can safely predict what the bank trust office will look like, and how it will make its decisions, even well into the future; we have several centuries of experience to draw on in describing how a trust company works.

There are two problems with trust companies for many of our clients. First, the banks have begun to set their fees and selection criteria to favor larger estates. For many banks, that means that they are not interested in acting if your estate does not exceed a million dollars in value — though many banks’ minimums are half that, and banks will often accept estates that are less than their stated minimums.

The other objection we often hear to naming a bank: they tend to be an expensive option. To administer a continuing trust, most banks will charge between 1% and 1.5% of the value of the trust each year (although the precise figures vary widely and are often negotiable). To handle the administration of an estate that will be closed in a year or so, the bank may charge 3%-5% of the value of the estate — or more, if there are complicated assets, difficult administration issues or a modest estate.

Banks also tend to be very conservative organizations, with plenty of rules and a complicated decision-making hierarchy. They may decline to handle real estate, for example, or have a very methodical and inflexible approach to investments or to making distribution decisions. For many clients that is exactly why the banks are a comfortable choice. For others, that can make them look less attractive.

2. Professional fiduciaries. In recent decades an industry of non-bank private fiduciaries has grown up in Arizona (and in many other states). There is even an organization of professional fiduciaries — the Arizona Fiduciaries Association. If your estate is too modest to interest the banks, or if you anticipate that there will be a need for a lot of personal oversight (if, for example, you want to set up a special needs trust for your child who has a disability), the non-bank fiduciaries may be an option.

The good news: the ranks of professional fiduciaries include social workers, accountants, lawyers, money managers, and individuals with a variety of backgrounds and interests. There is a high likelihood that you can locate someone who will be a good fit for your personal situation.

There are a number of problems with naming professional fiduciaries to handle your estate, however. First, the individual fiduciary is probably (we might even say “likely”) mortal. They might not outlive you, in fact — and they probably won’t still be around to handle the trust you set up for your great-grandchildren. Unlike the centuries-long experience with bank trust companies, we do not yet know what the professional fiduciary industry will look like decades into the future.

Private fiduciaries can also be expensive. Many private fiduciaries will charge hourly rates (which tends to save some of the expense, though it can actually increase the cost). Some will charge amounts similar to those charged by bank trust companies — though they may provide additional services, like care management, in those similar costs.

3. Other trusted professionals. Many of our clients choose to name their accountant, or their investment adviser, or their lawyer, to handle their estate. Yes, that can sometimes mean they name our office, and we are willing to name ourselves in documents we prepare — though we encourage clients to think of us as a last choice.

The good news: if you name someone who has already been involved in your life you increase the likelihood that the “fit” will be good. As you continue to work with the person named in your estate plan, you can periodically re-assess that fit and modify your estate planning if it becomes an issue. You will also have a fairly good idea of how rates are set, and whether the costs are reasonable.

As with other non-institutional fiduciaries, one big problem with the professional adviser is (how do we say this delicately) a general lack of immortality. Your accountant’s firm may continue for years after your own accountant dies (or retires), but are you comfortable in predicting that it will have the same values, principles and personality?

4. Friends. Sometimes clients name long-time friends to handle their estates. They may reason that friends’ values and reliability are known quantities. Friends, in turn, are likely to know your values and to make decisions in a way that you would have approved, had you still been around to monitor the administration of your estate.

The good news: friends tend to be less expensive than most of the professional choices, and there is indeed a high likelihood that they will know your family situation and personal values. If you name a close friend, however, you should periodically pull out your estate plan and reconsider whether it remains the right selection — our personal relationships do tend to fluctuate over time.

The bottom line: there often is not a perfectly obvious answer. It can be challenging to balance costs, availability (over the long term) and suitability to come up with the best choice to handle your estate. And we haven’t even discussed the differences between naming a personal representative for your will (the more modern term for the commonly-used “executor”), a trustee for your trust (what many people actually mean when they say “executor”) and an agent for your power of attorney (the role that is often most important while you are still alive). Maybe another day. In the meantime, keep those questions coming.

©2017 Fleming & Curti, PLC