Posts Tagged ‘1041’

Income Taxation of Trusts — Not Just Special Needs Trusts

APRIL 6, 2015 VOLUME 22 NUMBER 13

We have previously explained the income taxation of self-settled special needs trusts and third-party special needs trusts. We focused on special needs trusts because, well, that’s what we do — and also because there seems to be so much confusion about special needs trusts. But that is not the only confusion out there. We find a lot of confusion about taxation of trusts, generally. Let’s see if we can clarify some of the issues.

The income tax issues are actually the same for trusts that are not “special needs” trusts. But the generalizations are a little harder to keep straight, since there is a much broader variety of trusts out in the world. So let’s see if we can lay out some questions and answers to help you understand the issues.

The first question: is the trust a “grantor” trust?

Why is this question the first (and probably the most important)? Because if the trust is a grantor trust it (a) does not need to have a separate taxpayer identification number (what is called an EIN, or Employer Identification Number, in tax language) and (b) should not file a separate tax return. If the trust is a grantor trust, you can (and usually should, if only for convenience purposes) use the grantor’s Social Security Number and report income on the grantor’s personal income tax return.

So how do you know if your trust is a grantor trust? Let’s ask a few qualifying questions:

  • Did you create the trust, or did the money in the trust once belong to you?
  • Is the trust revocable (by you)?
  • Are you the trustee?
  • Are you a beneficiary of the trust?

If you answer the first question “yes” and any one or more of the following questions “yes,” your trust is almost certainly a grantor trust. There are some exceptions, but they are relatively rare. Talk to your attorney and your tax preparer — and we recommend you talk with both. Why? There is a lot of misunderstanding out there, and neither lawyers nor accountants always get the answer right on this question.

What are the most common misunderstandings? You will sometimes hear accountants, bankers, stockbrokers and lawyers assure you that an irrevocable trust that names someone other than the grantor as trustee must have a separate EIN (and, presumably, file a separate tax return). That’s simply not true. It’s also not relevant to whether or not the trust is a grantor trust.

There are also some “magic” provisions in irrevocable trusts that are usually used precisely to make them grantor trusts. If, for instance, your irrevocable trust includes a provision that says the person who set it up retains the right to trade (“substitute”) property in the trust for their own property, it’s pretty likely that was included precisely to make sure the trust is a grantor trust.

What if the trust is not a grantor trust?

Then the trust will need an EIN, and it will file a separate income tax return. That does not necessarily mean it will pay any income tax, but it will need a return filed.

Depending on the language of the trust and the nature of its distributions, some or all (or, rarely, none) of its distributions will be taxed to the recipient — or to the person who benefited from the distribution. So, for instance, if a non-grantor trust sends cash to its beneficiary, the beneficiary will probably pay some income tax on the distribution. Same answer if, instead, the trust pays the beneficiary’s rent, college tuition and car payments directly — all of those distributions are for the benefit of the beneficiary.

Note that not all of the trust’s distributions will be treated as income to the beneficiary. Only the portion of the distributions that would have been taxed to the trust (that is, the trust’s income) will be subject to being passed through to the beneficiary. So, for instance, if a trust has $1,000 of interest income, and pays $15,000 in rent and tuition bills for the beneficiary, no more than that $1,000 figure will be taxable income to the beneficiary. At least some of the administrative costs will probably be deductible before calculating the tax effect.

How does the non-grantor trust report its income for tax purposes?

The federal tax form used by trusts is called the 1041 (it’s similar to, but different from, the individual’s 1040 income tax form). It actually looks a little simpler than the personal income tax return, but that’s misleading — some of the accounting and tax concepts are more complicated and less understood. We recommend that trustees get a professional to prepare the trust’s tax return.

What about state income tax returns?

The trustee will likely need to file state income tax returns that mirror the federal return. But for which state(s)? That’s a hard question to answer, and impossible to generalize about. Some states want trust income tax returns for any trust that has a trustee or co-trustee living in their state. Others look primarily to where any one beneficiary lives. Other states do not have income tax at all, and so do not require a trust to file an income tax return. Your professional tax preparer will want to consider at least: (a) the language of the trust, (b) the residence of all beneficiaries, and (c) the residence of all trustees.

Can any tax preparer handle a trust’s income tax return?

Yes. Probably. Maybe. Wait — let us ask you a question: have you asked the tax preparer how often he or she prepares trust income tax returns? If not, we suggest you might want to ask. The returns are not bewilderingly complicated, but they are unfamiliar to people — even professionals — who are not used to working with them. Your best bet: get a professional (probably a CPA, perhaps a lawyer or law firm) who does this kind of tax return on a regular basis.

Good luck getting through this tax season. We hope this helps. Be careful, though — there are exceptions and qualifications to the general rules we’ve outlined. Check with your experienced tax preparer or attorney before actually preparing returns. Better yet: let the professionals do it.

Income Taxation of the Self-Settled Special Needs Trust

MARCH 16, 2015 VOLUME 22 NUMBER 11

This time of year, we are often asked about income tax issues — especially when a trust is involved. It may take us several newsletters, but let’s see if we can’t demystify the income taxation of trusts. We will start with the type of trust we most often get asked about: self-settled special needs trusts.

We will ask you to imagine that you are the trustee of a special needs trust, set up for the benefit of your sister Allie. This trust was funded with proceeds from a lawsuit settlement. Allie is on AHCCCS (she lives in Arizona, where we renamed Medicaid “the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System” or AHCCCS), and she receives Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits.

[Note: everything we explain here would be the same if Allie was your son, or your aunt, or your husband. It would also be true if the money in the trust came from the probate estate of your grandmother, who left Allie a share of her estate in cash (as opposed to in trust). It would be the same if the court established the trust for Allie, or her mother signed the trust, or if you signed the trust as Allie’s guardian. This advice will probably also be correct if Allie is receiving Social Security Disability Insurance payments — on her own account or on your father’s account — and/or Medicare instead of Medicaid/AHCCCS. If the trust does not include a provision that the Medicaid agency must be paid back upon Allie’s death, the answers we give here might be incorrect — wait until next week to read about that kind of special needs trust.]

Allie never actually signed the trust, but because she was once entitled to receive the trust’s assets outright it is treated (for most purposes) as if she did establish the trust herself. Even though the trust was created or approved by the court, or signed by Allie’s parents, or established by her guardian, it is almost universally referred to as a “self-settled” special needs trust. Those few practitioners who don’t use that term almost all prefer “first-party” special needs trust (though there may be differences regarding whether to hyphenate either descriptive title). We’re going to refer to it as a self-settled special needs trust.

Allie’s self-settled special needs trust has another descriptive name: it is also a “grantor” trust. That term really only has meaning for U.S. federal income tax purposes, but that’s a pretty important purpose and so the term is pervasive. Is it possible that Allie’s trust is not a grantor trust? Yes, barely. The key shorthand way to double-check: look for a provision that says Allie’s Medicaid expenses must be repaid with trust assets upon her death. If that language is in there, either the trust is a grantor trust or someone has created a really peculiar instrument. If that language is not in there, there’s actually a chance the trust is not a grantor trust — before going further with this analysis, go ask a qualified attorney or CPA whether the trust is a grantor trust.

Let’s assume we’ve gotten past this issue, and we can all agree that Allie’s trust is a grantor trust. What does that mean for income tax purposes? Two important things:

  1. Allie’s trust will never pay a separate income tax (well, at least not as long as she’s alive). The trust’s income will always be taxable on her personal, individual, non-trust tax return.
  2. Allie’s trust will also never need to file a separate income tax return. In fact, it will never be allowed to file a separate income tax return.

There is a lot of confusion about Allie’s special needs trust. Does it need to get its own taxpayer identification number (actually, the correct term is Employer Identification Number, or EIN)? No. Then why do accountants, bankers, brokers, even lawyers keep telling you that it does? Because they are wrong, that’s why. Many of them believe that any time a trust has a trustee who is not also a beneficiary the trust must get an EIN. That is not correct.

But just because Allie’s trust doesn’t need an EIN doesn’t mean that it can’t have one. You are permitted to get an EIN for Allie’s trust if you want to.

Let’s assume for a moment that you have not gotten an EIN. In that case, every bank and stockbroker (anyone who pays money to the trust, in fact) should be given Allie’s Social Security number for reporting purposes. The trust’s income will simply be included on Allie’s 1040 (her personal income tax return). Some trust expenses may be legitimate deductions from income, but the Internal Revenue Service effectively ignores Allie’s special needs trust.

That was easy, wasn’t it? Let’s make it just a little more difficult.

Maybe you did get an EIN for Allie’s trust. What kind of tax filings should you make in that case?

Armed with an EIN, you should give that number to banks, stockbrokers and anyone else who holds the trust’s money. The trust’s EIN should not be on Allie’s own bank account (where her SSI gets deposited), even though you might be both trustee and representative payee — and the two funds should not be mixed.

As trustee, you will need to file a fiduciary income tax return — the IRS form number is 1041. It will be easy to file, however. You simply type on the form (there’s no box for this — just type it in the middle of the “Income” section of the form): “This trust is a Grantor Trust under IRC sections 671-679. A statement of items taxable to the grantor is attached.” The exact language is not critical, but that is the sense of what you should tell the IRS. Then attach a summary statement of all items of income and deductible expenses the trust has handled (things paid directly out of Allie’s Social Security account should not be included here).

That’s it. No tax payment. No deductions on the fiduciary income tax return. You are supposed to issue a 1099 (not a K-1, if you are in to those characterizations) for the dividend and interest income received under the trust’s EIN. Those things then get listed on Allie’s personal income tax return (her 1040), and taxed as if they had come directly to Allie — even though they didn’t.

That was pretty easy, wasn’t it? Next week we’ll look at third-party special needs trusts. If you want to get a little preview, you might consider the year-old but still excellent analysis from the Special Needs Alliance about special needs trust taxation.

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