Posts Tagged ‘dependents’

Helping Care for Your Relative Provides Income Tax Benefits

APRIL 9, 2012 VOLUME 19 NUMBER 14
Federal and Arizona state income tax returns are due next week. It’s a good time to review tax deductions for one of the common situations we deal with: in-home (or, for that matter, institutional) caregiving for an infirm family member.

We wrote about an individual case involving long-term care deductions last fall. In that case no returns had been filed, so the taxpayer was playing catch-up — but the U.S. Tax Court agreed that she could deduct the expenses of in-home caregivers. The Court articulated a three-item test to determine whether the taxpayer was a “chronically ill” individual; once she had met any one test, the taxpayer could deduct her medical expenses, including the caregivers.

But what if the caretaking expenses had been paid by someone other than the taxpayer herself? If, for example, she had lived with her adult daughter and the daughter had paid for caretakers to come to the home?

In such a case the daughter should be able to deduct the expenses of care — provided that the patient is a “dependent.” That requires the taxpayer using the deduction to have provided more than half of the patient’s support, and is only available if the patient is a relative OR lived with the taxpayer.

The details about deducting medical expenses for a relative or someone who lives with you are spelled out in IRS Publication 502. Don’t fret about the official-sounding title — it’s actually straightforward and understandable. It also explains exactly what the IRS is looking for when you deduct your own OR a dependent’s medical expenses, and what documentation you will need to provide (or maintain in case you are challenged).

Of course the medical deductions only affect your federal income tax to the extent that they total more than 7.5% of your Adjusted Gross Income (AGI). For many people that limitation is hard to meet. Anyone paying for in-home caregivers, though, is likely to have gotten near to or exceeded the 7.5% threshold.

What about listing a relative (other than your minor children) as a dependent on your own tax returns? Is it possible that the daughter in our earlier scenario might be able to list her mother as a depedent if the mother lives in her home? For that matter, can she list her mother as a dependent if she lives in a nursing home or assisted living facility, but the daughter pays the bill?

The short answer in both cases is “yes.” A parent can be a dependent. That can mean, as described above, that their medical expenses may be listed as deductions on your return — but it also leads to a more direct benefit. If you can list your parent (or another relative) as a dependent, you can get an additional exemption — which reduces your taxable income even before looking for eligible deductions like medical expenses.

Can your parent be your dependent? Yes, but the requirements can be a little complicated. First, they must EITHER be a “qualifying relative” (pretty much any kind of relative you can name, including stepchildren and foster children) OR live with you. In addition, they may not have more than $3,700 (in 2011) of their own income. You must also provide at least half of their support. There are limited exceptions to some of those rules, but that’s the basic test for determining whether you can claim a parent or another person as a dependent. NOTE: these rules are not the same as the ones determining whether you can claim your minor children as dependents — THOSE rules can be much more detailed and complicated.

How can you figure out if you meet all the tests (and their exceptions)? You may not be surprised to learn that the IRS has a Publication to explain that. It is IRS Publication 501, and (just like the earlier Publication we mentioned) it is actually helpful and understandable information.

Can you get a direct credit for the caretaking services you provided for your mother yourself last year? Generally, no — and if you think about it that shouldn’t be too surprising. If you could deduct the value of those services, you would need to claim a similar amount as “income.” But that doesn’t mean that there is no tax benefit to having provided those services. First, they will help you establish that you have provided more than half the support necessary for your parent or family member. Second, you might be eligible to deduct expenses (but not the value of your caregiving) for a dependent. Look at IRS Form 2441 for Child and Dependent Care Expenses; the separate instructions for Form 2441 are (wait for it) straightforward and understandable.

Summing up: taking care of a relative (or someone who lives with you, even if they are not a relative) may be personally and emotionally rewarding. It will not usually be profitable. At least, though, there are some slight tax benefits for those who undertake what is usually a labor of love. Make sure you claim deductions and exemptions you are entitled to by virtue of your caregiving services.

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