Posts Tagged ‘Illinois’

Estate Planning is a Process, Not a Binder of Forms

JANUARY 23, 2017 VOLUME 24 NUMBER 4
There really is no question that it is important for almost every adult to have a will, and to consider signing both financial and health care powers of attorney. That is what we mean by “estate planning,” and it is important to go through the process of preparing those documents.

But that is not enough. There also are questions about beneficiary designations and other ownership arrangements. Some consideration should be given to whether a trust is necessary or important. And the whole process needs to be undertaken on a recurring basis. Signing your will is usually not the end of the process, and even when it is the whole thing needs to be reviewed again whenever you have major life changes.

Want a story that explains why you need to update your estate plan? Consider Robert Hendricks (not his real name) from Illinois. He was the father of two young sons. He and the mother of those two boys had recently undergone a difficult divorce. He wanted his sister to manage his estate, and to act as trustee for the benefit of his sons. He even signed a will making those changes — naming his sister as personal representative (executor), naming her as trustee for the boys’ benefit, and leaving his entire estate to the boys’ trusts.

Shortly after the divorce was finalized, Robert tragically took his own life. His sister initiated a probate proceeding, and his will was admitted to probate. But one of the Robert’s principal assets was his 401(k) plan, set up through his work. What would become of that retirement plan?

Robert’s 401(k) account simply did not name a beneficiary. In that case, would it pass to his estate, and thus to the trust for his sons? No, as it turns out.

Like many 401(k) plans, Robert’s spelled out what happens when no beneficiary is named. According to the plan’s summary documents, in that case the participant’s spouse would be the beneficiary, and if there was no spouse then the participant’s children would become beneficiaries. Since Robert’s divorce was final at the time of his death, that made his sons beneficiaries of his retirement plan.

Problem solved. That’s also what Robert’s will specified, right? Well, not quite. Robert’s will would have left all of his money in that trust, controlled by his sister. If his sons are the direct beneficiaries of his retirement plan, then their mother — Robert’s ex-wife — would have priority to manage the funds until the boys reached the age of majority.

Robert’s sister filed a petition with the probate court, asking to be named as the custodian of the retirement accounts for the benefit of the boys as specified in the will. The probate court agreed, and ordered the proceeds paid into accounts under Robert’s sister’s control. The boys’ mother objected, and appealed the decision.

The Illinois Court of Appeals disagreed, and overruled the probate court’s order. The appellate judges noted that Robert’s ex-wife, as the only parent of the two boys, had the clear priority to serve as conservator of their funds, or custodian of any money in a Uniform Transfer to Minors Act (UTMA) account, or in any other capacity.

Furthermore, the proceeds from Robert’s 401(k) were not within the control of the probate court, said the appellate judges. His will did not control where the proceeds went, since the summary plan documents themselves made clear that they went directly to the beneficiaries. The Court of Appeals directed the probate court to reverse its order and leave Robert’s sister out of the loop with regard to his retirement assets. Estate of Hintz, January 10, 2017.

Robert’s story is illustrative of a problem we see on a regular basis. If a client carefully considers his or her estate planning, and signs documents perfectly calculated to accomplish their goals, the inquiry (and, often, our task) is not completed. Beneficiary designations and titling arrangements can undo the best-laid plans. What’s worse: even if everything gets done, and done right, at the time of our office appointment, changes in documents, life arrangements or circumstances can undo the good work of careful estate planning.

All of that is why we ask a lot of questions about insurance beneficiaries, retirement arrangements, and financial account titling. That is also why we ask clients to come back and visit with us every five years or so — or, as in Robert’s case, when they get divorced, have children, get married, change employment arrangements or have other major life changes.

Estate planning is not a set of documents. It is a process, and it continues, morphs and develops over time.

Two Adult Adoptions Lead to Uncertain Inheritance Outcomes

JANUARY 2, 2017 VOLUME 24 NUMBER 1
You probably know that it’s possible — though state laws vary quite a bit — to adopt an adult. But have you given any thought to what effect the adoption might have on inheritance rights? That’s the sort of problem that gets lawyers (and judges) excited. Two recent appellate decisions for Iowa and Illinois address similar but different adult adoption conundrums.

In Iowa, Marian (we’re just going to use first names here — no disrespect intended) had two adult children, Russell and Marcia. Marian’s sister-in-law Janice had no children. Janice intended to leave her estate to Russell, but under Iowa law that would mean that he had to pay a tax on his inheritance, because he was not her child.

In order to avoid that inheritance tax, Janice adopted her nephew Russell after he became an adult. That worked just fine, and avoided any tax — but what about Russell’s relationship with his biological mother, Marian?

When Marian died in 2014, her will divided her estate between “my children, [Russell] and [Marcia], share and share alike.” But was Russell still Marian’s child? Marcia argued that her brother was really her former brother, and his adoption by Janice effectively disinherited him from her mother’s will.

The Iowa probate court was not impressed with the argument, and neither was the Iowa Supreme Court. Though the adult adoption severed the parent/child relationship between Marian and Russell, Marian’s will specifically named her children. According to the state’s high court, that created a presumption that she meant to include Russell even though he might have been adopted by someone else. Roll v. Newhall, December 23, 2016.

Meanwhile, the Illinois courts were faced with a flip-side problem when Betty adopted her step-son Ron. You see, Ron’s mother and father were divorced when he was three, and he was raised mostly by his mother. His father remarried and Ron did spend considerable time (particularly in high school) with his father and step-mother.

When Ron was 21, his step-mother Betty’s mother died, leaving a trust that would ultimately flow to Betty’s children. A year later Betty asked Ron if he would be willing to let her adopt him. Betty’s father later modified his own will to specifically disinherit Ron, but Betty’s mother’s trust was already in place.

When Betty died fifteen years later, her mother’s trust was set to benefit her children. Was Ron a child for purposes of that trust? That was the question facing the Iowa probate court.

Over the objections of Betty’s other relatives, the probate court determined that the adult adoption was effective. Ron would receive a share of his adopted grandmother’s trust. The Illinois Court of Appeals upheld that ruling.

The key question in Ron’s story was whether the adoption was a “subterfuge.” If the other heirs could show that Betty’s adoption of Ron was solely motivated by her desire to make him a descendant for purposes of her mother’s trust, then they might be able to challenge the adoption.

The other relatives pointed out that Ron was an adult when Betty adopted him, that the timing was suspect (coming just a year after Betty’s mother’s estate was opened), that Ron didn’t even tell his biological mother about the adoption until Betty’s later death, and that Ron himself had acknowledged that Betty was motivated to adopt him for “estate reasons.” On the other hand, evidence showed that Ron had spent considerable time with Betty and his father after they were married, that he lived nearby at the time of the adoption, and that Ron and Betty had a close, coninuing relationship for over thirty years. The effectiveness of the adoption was upheld. In re: Estate and Trust of Weidner, December 20, 2016.

Would the same cases be decided the same way in Arizona? Perhaps not.

First of all, adult adoptions in Arizona are sharply limited. Arizona’s statute on the subject, ARS section 14-8101, permits adult adoptions only when the person being adopted is:

  1. Over age 18 but no older than 21, and
  2. A stepchild, niece, nephew, cousin, grandchild or (sometimes) a foster child of the person adopting.

Under the second test, either Russell or Ron could have been adopted just as they were in Iowa and Illinois. But both of them were over age 21 when adopted, so those adoptions could not have been completed in Arizona.

Assuming, though, that the adoptions were effective in Iowa, Illinois or wherever concluded, Arizona would honor the other state’s (different) rules. If adoptive parents Marian or Betty had moved to Arizona after adopting Russell or Ron, the same legal problems might have arisen.

One other state law difference that might have made the outcome in Marian and Russell’s case: nothing in the adult adoption statutes in Arizona requires that the existing parental relationship be dissolved. Russell could presumably be his aunt Janice’s son AND his mother Marian’s son at the same time. Of course, this outcome is harder to test — Arizona does not have an inheritance tax like Iowa’s, and so it is difficult to think of why the story might play out in the same way.

©2017 Fleming & Curti, PLC