Posts Tagged ‘mandatory reporting’

Reporting Abuse, Neglect or Exploitation of Vulnerable Adults

DECEMBER 23, 2013 VOLUME 20 NUMBER 48

As people live longer and the elderly population increases, so does the likelihood of abuse, neglect and exploitation of vulnerable adults. Lawyers, accountants, doctors, nurses, caretakers, bankers — indeed, any professional — faces a growing probability that at some point they will be confronted with the issue of whether to report suspected abuse, neglect or exploitation. For lawyers, especially, the ethical requirement that client confidences be maintained can complicate the problem.

There were over 1,600 allegations of abuse, neglect or exploitation of vulnerable adults reported in Pima County, Arizona (the Tucson area) last year. Surprisingly, fewer than 1% of these were reported by legal professionals. Arizona law imposes an affirmative duty on attorneys to report suspected exploitation of a vulnerable adult to the authorities. Arizona Revised Statutes § 46-454(b) requires any attorney who is responsible for preparing the tax records of a vulnerable adult, or responsible for any “action concerning the use or preservation of the vulnerable adult’s property and who, in the course of fulfilling that responsibility, discovers a reasonable basis to believe that exploitation of the adult’s property has occurred or that abuse or neglect of the adult has occurred shall immediately report or cause reports to be made …”

Keep in mind that an individual does not have to be “elderly” to be a vulnerable adult. Any adult who is unable to protect himself or herself from abuse, neglect or exploitation by others because of a physical or mental impairment is a vulnerable adult. The definition of vulnerable adult is broad and so are the types of abuse and exploitation that the statute is intended to cover. Financial exploitation of vulnerable adults occurs with alarming frequency and in many cases goes unreported because the victim may not be aware of the ways in which he or she is being exploited.

Reports of suspected abuse can be made to the City Police, County Sheriff or (statewide) Adult Protective Services. The Pima County Public Fiduciary also handles cases of suspected financial exploitation. Even if suspected abuse is later found to be unsubstantiated, there are no penalties for good faith reporting. Any attorney who makes a report in good faith is likely to have some civil and/or criminal immunity from liability. You can make a report anonymously, however, the law requires that the report be made immediately, otherwise you may be found guilty of a class 1 misdemeanor.

So, you may be reading this and thinking: “how can I uphold my duty of confidentiality to my client if I suspect that he or she may be a victim of abuse, neglect or exploitation?” How is it possible to balance this ethical duty when reporting of suspected abuse is mandatory? In Arizona, you will not breach your duty of confidentiality if you reveal only information to the extent you believe is necessary to comply with a law that requires the disclosure of such information.

Arizona’s version of the ethical rules governing lawyers provides specific guidance to attorneys in cases where an attorney believes that his or her client of diminished capacity is at “risk of substantial physical, financial or other harm unless action is taken and cannot adequately act in the client’s own interest.” In these specific cases, an attorney may take “reasonably necessary protective action,” including consulting with individuals or entities who may be able to protect a client with diminished capacity.  In taking any protective action, among other considerations, an attorney may be guided by the client’s best interests or the wishes and values of the client.

Pima County (and Arizona) is home to a growing number of seniors and vulnerable adults. As we consider the ways our practices can build a healthy community, we must remember the duty of advocacy we owe our clients. If you suspect a case of abuse is occurring and feel unsure about your duty to report, then reach out to one of our colleagues who specialize in professional responsibility or call the Arizona State Bar Ethics Hotline.

What about lawyers practicing in other jurisdictions? State laws vary — many states have mandatory reporting requirements but quite a few of them either do not extend to, or specifically exempt, lawyers from coverage. The ethical rules permitting disclosure when the client is at risk, however, have been adopted in substantially similar form in almost every state.

What about other professionals? Arizona’s mandatory reporting law is very clear: doctors and other medical providers are covered as to reporting abuse, neglect and exploitation, and accountants and tax preparers are covered as to reporting exploitation. Other states vary, with some focusing on medical providers and others on social workers and government officials. If you work with seniors and/or adults with diminished capacity, you should check into your state laws regarding mandatory reporting of abuse, neglect and/or exploitation.

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