Posts Tagged ‘medical directives’

What Have We Learned From The Tragedy of Terri Schiavo?

APRIL 4, 2005  VOLUME 12, NUMBER 40

By most reports Terri Schiavo was a shy and quiet woman, and she might well have been distressed if she had anticipated that the process of her dying would become such a public spectacle. Much has been written about her, her family, her wishes, her condition, and the political and religious factions aligned on one side or the other. In fact, too much has been written already—but we are compelled to seek some greater meaning for the public in her very private tragedy.

Regardless of individual reactions to the long death of Terri Schiavo, there are practical lessons for consideration. First among those, of course, is the importance of executing medical directives while still able to do so.

Every adult, regardless of age, should designate an individual (and one or more alternates) to make medical decisions in the event of incapacity. Whether the document is called a health care power of attorney, a health proxy designation or something else, it is important to designate a surrogate. Do not put it off because you do not think you are at risk. Terri Schiavo was 27 when she collapsed suddenly. Nancy Beth Cruzan was 25 when an auto accident left her brain-injured and catapulted her case into national headlines in the mid-1980s. A decade earlier, 21-year-old Karen Ann Quinlan’s injuries from a night of mixing alcohol and valium first focused public attention on legal, ethical and moral issues surrounding the end of life.

In addition to nomination of a surrogate to make personal and medical decisions, most individuals should also sign a statement indicating their wishes. The unfortunately-named “living will” can express a wish not to be treated in some circumstances, or to receive full treatment in any event, or any other variation imaginable. Under Arizona law, any statement describing your wishes can qualify as a living will—write it, sign it and have it witnessed (usually by two people) and you have made a significant contribution to your own peace of mind.

Arizona law provides a form for health care powers of attorney and living wills, but permits other options. Lawyers usually prepare the documents in connection with general estate planning, but a lawyer is not required. Forms are available from hospitals, area agencies on aging, and advocacy groups. A number of perfectly acceptable variations can be found online, including those at the Arizona Attorney General’s website.

Another option: the National Right to Life’s “Will to Live” directs provision of medical care under nearly all circumstances. It also expresses the view that tube feedings are not medical care, and should be continued in most circumstances.

Arizona law also recognizes advance directives authorizing mental health treatment, and directing withholding of CPR and resuscitative efforts. Those forms are not as important for most people but can be essential in some cases. For more information about the options in Arizona (including both mental health powers and the “orange form” governing out-of-hospital resuscitation) check into our Question and Answer section on advance directives.

Whatever documents you do sign, it is also important to circulate them widely. Encourage discussion of your wishes while you are still able to participate and you will increase the likelihood that those wishes will be honored.

©2017 Fleming & Curti, PLC