Posts Tagged ‘New Mexico’

Arizona Legislature Changes Format For Beneficiary Deed

APRIL 3, 2006  VOLUME 13, NUMBER 40

Five years ago the Arizona Legislature adopted an interesting new law. Modeled on a similar law in Missouri, the “beneficiary deed” statute permitted property owners to designate who would receive their property on death—much like a “payable on death” bank account. Now the state legislature has revisited beneficiary deeds, and made them even more flexible and useful.

One unanswered problem arose a handful of times under the previous law. What would happen if a person named to receive property by a beneficiary deed died before the original property owner? If, for example, a parent signed a beneficiary deed to “my two children, John and Mary,” and Mary died before the parent leaving children of her own, did that mean that her children would receive her share, or that son John would own the entire property on the parent’s death?

Effective this fall (the date is not yet set and won’t be known until the legislature adjourns) beneficiary deeds can solve that problem. Under a law signed by Governor Napolitano on March 24, 2006, all new beneficiary deeds must include a paragraph indicating which of two choices the owner prefers. The language required by the new law:

If a grantee beneficiary predeceases the owner, the conveyance to that grantee beneficiary shall either (choose one):

[] Become null and void.

[] Become part of the estate of the grantee beneficiary.

There are still a number of important issues to remember in the use of beneficiary deeds, and it will not be appropriate in every case to use this approach to transfer property. With some of the following limitations in mind, however, it may be that the beneficiary deed is a simple, inexpensive and useful method to avoid probate, especially in small estates. Among the remaining limitations for beneficiary deeds:

  • They are not available in every state. As of this writing, only Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nevada, New Mexico and Ohio permit the use of beneficiary deeds.
  • An individual using a beneficiary deed will need to coordinate his or her estate plan as to multiple assets—it may, for instance, be necessary to keep track of beneficiary designations on multiple properties, several bank accounts, and a number of insurance policies and brokerage accounts. Anyone with more than a handful of assets should probably consider a living trust instead.
  • A beneficiary deed can be changed by a surviving owner, so in the case of a husband and wife (for example), the final distribution is not set until the second death.
  • The beneficiary deed provides no estate tax planning benefits for larger estates.

And what about individuals who signed an Arizona beneficiary deed before the new law was passed? Nothing in the law requires them to change their deeds, but they would be well-advised to consider updating the language to clarify what would happen if a beneficiary died before them. For those who might sign a beneficiary deed between now and the effective date, the best approach is less clear. Both the existing law and the new version require that beneficiary deeds be “substantially in the following form”—and then the form changes. Our advice: if you plan on signing an Arizona beneficiary deed in the next few months, expect to sign an updated version this fall.

Arizona Community Property Is Not Always Subject To Probate

OCTOBER 9, 2000 VOLUME 8, NUMBER 15

Arizona is one of nine “community property” states in the country, and that can be the source of some confusion about estate planning, taxes and property ownership rights for married couples. Recent changes in Arizona’s law make the “community property” designation a little more friendly and understandable, and the benefits to this unique property ownership choice are now clearer.

“Community property” concepts were not part of the English common law. Under the system imported to most of the American states, property was owned by one spouse or the other, though the non-owner might acquire some rights in his or her spouse’s property. The French and Spanish, however, understood the marital community to be a separate entity from either spouse individually, and permitted the “community” to own property. Each spouse then holds an equal interest in the community’s property.

Those American states with rich Spanish or French histories tended to adopt some version of the community property concept. Arizona, California, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington and Wisconsin are community property states, although the method of implementing the concept varies somewhat. Alaska also permits some trust assets to be held as community property.

In community property states a married couple is presumed to hold assets as community property regardless of the actual title on the asset. Couples may, however, choose to hold their property in joint tenancy or as tenants in common if they wish.

One important advantage to having assets titled as community property comes, oddly enough, from federal tax law. Although capital gains taxes are ordinarily due any time an appreciated asset is sold, the increased value of property held by a decedent at the time of death is not taxed. The property’s income tax “basis” is said to “step up” to its value on the date of the owner’s death, often resulting in substantial income tax savings for heirs.

Jointly owned property only receives a partial “step up” in basis. Property held in joint tenancy will usually only get half the income tax benefit on the death of one joint owner. Community property, however, is treated differently: the entire value of a community property asset gets “stepped up” to the value on the first spouse’s death, resulting in twice the income tax savings.

The main drawback to holding community property in Arizona has long been the requirement of a probate proceeding to pass the property to the surviving spouse. Although the long-term tax savings can be substantial, the probate costs are immediate and, in most people’s minds, too high. Since 1995 Arizona has permitted married couples the best of both worlds: property can be held as “community property with right of survivorship” and secure the favorable income tax treatment while still avoiding the probate process. The value of this type of property ownership is, of course, restricted to married couples.

One caveat: some commentators, relying on fairly arcane interpretations of the federal tax law, argue that the “community property with right of survivorship” designation could conceivably be found to result in no step up in tax basis at all. So far the federal government has not taken such a position, but there remains some slight possibility of a problem. In addition, the effect of titling separate property as community property (with or without the “right of survivorship” language) has more than just tax effects. In other words, you should consult an Arizona attorney before changing title on your existing assets or deciding how to title a new acquisition.

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