Posts Tagged ‘trust’

What Is a Trust Protector? Do You Need One In Your Trust?

JUNE 27, 2011 VOLUME 18 NUMBER 23
We have written before about Arizona’s new Trust Code, and the Uniform Trust Code on which it is based. The “new” law (it became effective on January 1, 2009, so it’s not that new any more) included a number of changes to the way trusts have worked in Arizona for decades. One of the minor, but interesting, provisions is the formal creation of a position called “trust protector.”

To be clear, there was nothing prohibiting inclusion of a trust protector before the new law. So far there are no court cases to help flesh out the powers and duties a trust protector may be given. But we do now have a statute — Arizona Revised Statutes section 14-10818 — which gives clear authority for inclusion of this unusual beast.

So what is a trust protector? The person establishing a trust is permitted to include someone who would have the authority to make changes to the trust even after it becomes irrevocable — even, in fact, after the death of the original trust creator. That means you could name your sister (or your father, or your best friend from college, or your lawyer or accountant) to be the person who could make changes to the trust after your death, to protect the beneficiaries from unintended consequences — or from themselves.

There are no very serious limitations on the trust protector’s possible authority. The Arizona statute gives a handful of illustrations of the powers you might give the protector, but it doesn’t limit you to those ideas. Here are the powers the legislature thought you might want to consider:

  1. The power to remove the trustee and appoint a new one. Worried that the bank might become too bureaucratic, or too expensive? A trust protector can help take that worry off your plate. Worried that your son might not be equipped to really handle the trust after your death? Trust protector to the rescue.
  2. The power to change the applicable state law. Do you think Iowa, or Oregon, or Georgia might be a better state to allow your trust’s purposes to be carried out (or reduce state income taxes, or extend the time for the trust to continue after your death)? We suggest those states precisely because they are not now noted for especially trust-friendly rules — but who knows what might happen in the future? A trust protector could monitor those developments and make a change when it makes more sense.
  3. Ability to change the terms of distribution. What if your daughter is embroiled in a messy divorce just at the time your trust is scheduled to dissolve and pay out to her? Or if your son is just about to declare bankruptcy? Or your grandson has just been diagnosed as mentally ill, and really needs a special needs trust to handle the inheritance you have left him? A trust protector could be given the power to change the date of distribution, or to establish a special needs trust, or whatever needs to be done.
  4. Amend the trust itself. You can even give a trust protector the power to amend the trust’s terms. That might include taking advantage of future tax alternatives, or giving a larger share to a grandchild who really needs help, or reducing the inheritance of a child who doesn’t need a full share.

These powers are illustrative, not mandatory. In other words, you can tailor your trust protector’s powers and duties to your own situation and your personal comfort level.

A trust protector can be very powerful, very helpful and very dangerous. It should be obvious that not everyone will want to establish such a super-powerful position in their trust. For those concerned about the difficulty of planning for an uncertain future, however, the trust protector might just be a very comforting and useful tool.

That all begs the question asked in our headline. Do you need a trust protector? Perhaps. We think maybe the first question should be: is there someone (other than your trustee) whom you completely trust to “get” exactly what you want done with your estate after your incapacity or death? If not, your trust is probably not a good candidate for inclusion of a trust protector. But if you do have that person in mind, then let’s talk about how to use them.

Dispute Over Family Home Pits Children Against Stepchildren

OCTOBER 19, 2009  VOLUME 16, NUMBER 58

More than a decade ago we told you about a Utah case involving a widower’s remarriage (see Surviving Spouse Revokes Trust–Children Disinherited from February 2, 1998) . Although the children of the deceased woman and her surviving husband were supposed to receive everything on his later death, the widower revoked his living trust and transferred everything to his new wife. The children were effectively disinherited.

Of course we see that result all the time, as unanticipated shifts in family dynamics follow death and remarriage. When two people with grown families marry, they seldom consider, much less carefully plan, what will happen when the inevitable occurs. Now an interesting case — and, interestingly, again out of Provo, Utah — raises an unusual variant of the same story.

Harold and Edith LeFevre had seven adult children. After Edith died in 1987, Harold married Ellen Stout, who had five grown children of her own. When Harold died in 1993, he had made no estate plan at all. The second Mrs. LeFevre met with her late husband’s children to discuss his estate, and they all agreed that she should live in the family home for the rest of her life. She agreed that she would create a trust that left the home to the children, and that she would handle the probate of Harold’s estate to get the house into the trust.

One month after Harold’s death his widow met with her attorney to plan her own estate. The trust she had him prepare, however, did not resemble the agreement she had entered into with her stepchildren. Instead, the LeFevre family home was left half to her stepchildren and half to her own children.

Ellen then handled the probate of her late husband’s estate, transferring the residence into the trust she had created. Two years later, she amended the trust to disinherit the LeFevre children altogether, leaving the home and all her other assets to her children only.

For nearly a decade Ellen LeFevre lived in the home, becoming increasingly reclusive and withdrawn. Her son encouraged her to cut off communication with her stepchildren, and when she died in 2004 they were not even aware of the fact for some months. After they learned of her death and requested a copy of the trust, they were surprised to learn that they would not receive any portion of their father’s estate.

In a contested proceeding, the probate judge imposed a “constructive” trust, ruling that Ellen LeFevre had agreed to place the home in trust and then had violated that agreement. The Utah Court of Appeals agreed, and ordered that the home be transferred back to the LeFevre children.

According to the appellate judges, Ellen LeFevre had entered into a valid agreement, she had breached the terms of that agreement, and her children had been “unjustly enriched” as a result of her breach. The appellate court did not agree with the children that they should have their attorney’s fees paid by Ellen LeFevre’s estate. In the Matter of the Estate of LeFevre, October 9, 2009.

©2014 Fleming & Curti, PLC